I’ve Been Reinvigorated

Reinvigorate is really nice. It’s a website statistics package, similar to Google Anlaytics and Mint. On the Reinvigorate home page, the service is described as “Measurement, performance, and regression analysis tools for evolving websites and blogs of all sizes”, sweet. Anyway, I signed up for the private beta a long time ago and finally received an invitation a few days ago.

Dougal Campbell has blogged about reinvigorate a couple times, check his posts out for some more background information on Reinvigorate.

Reinvigorated Detailed ActivityReinvigorate gives a really unique view of your website or blog, especially when it comes to tracking individual users. They also have a neat feature called “Name Tags”. Name Tags associate information on your website or blog (names, email addresses, etc) with the session id assigned by Reinvigorate. For example, this lets me track commenters based on the name they use when commenting. If someone comments, the name they used in the comment will show up in Reinvigorate. This makes it easy to see all the pages the commentor visited and how much time they spent on each page. Reinvigorate describes Name Tags as follows:

Name Tags are an easy way to identify exactly who your visitors are.

It works by associating information your site manages (username, e-mail, account ID, etc..) with the session ID Reinvigorate uses to track visitors on your site/blog.

It’s extremely simple to setup, even if your site uses its own proprietary user account system. 1-2 extra lines of code and we take care of the rest.

Reinvigorated - Plugin for WordPressName Tags are extremely simple to make use of if you use WordPress. Reinvigorate has a plugin for WordPress that makes using Name Tags a breeze. The plugin also prevents you from having to manually add the tracking code to your blog. You can turn on Name Tags right from the plugin options page. Just activate the plugin, enter your tracking id, turn Name Tags on or off, and you’re set.

I’m really happy with Reinvigorate after using it for only two days. It’s exciting to know it’s still in beta, so hopefully they’ll continue to add features and more options. One thing I would really like is the ability to select a date range to view data for. Especially for the search terms, I want to see my top search terms over certain periods of time. Same goes for popular pages too.

If you haven’t already, go sign up for the beta. You may have to wait a while for an invitation, but it’s worth the wait. I can’t wait to see what the developers have planned for Reinvigorate in the future.

Moving Servers At Dreamhost

After making this post, I submitted a support ticket to Dreamhost. Justin at Dreamhost replied back with a pretty solid sounding solution:

I did notice a few busy sites on the apaches for 2 of your domains. I started a move to another IP/apache which should complete in a few hours, and we can see if that apache turns out to be more stable. Since the server-status page for the old 2 showed an uptime of about 1 hour, likely the sites were causing that apache instance to time out and need to be restarted, resulting in a bit of downtime. Give it a try for a day and if you still have problems, let me know!

Perfect. Switch my domains over to a new httpd process with less activity. Makes sense. Well, after that was done, not much of an improvement was seen, as you can probably tell.

Today, I received another email from Justin saying he noticed longren.org was still slow to respond. He offered to move me to another server, assuming I was willing to have some downtime. He even asked if there was a time I’d prefer the move to be made. I asked him if 10:00 PST would work, and it did. So, this site is going to be offline for a few hours tonight while it’s being moved to a new server. The actual switch won’t take very long, I’ll just have to wait a few hours for the DNS to start pointing to the new IP.

Hopefully everything will be up and running along nice and smoothly tomorrow morning. Also, Justin at Dreamhost is awesome. He’s been very attentive and always offers possible solutions. Thanks again Justin!

Horrible Repsonse Time

longrenOrgEvenSlowerLongren.org has been really, really slow the last week or so. This site has never been this slow to load, even when I was hosting it out of my house on my cable connection. Granted, I didn’t get the traffic back then that I do now, it still shouldn’t be this slow.

Last time longren.org was being slow as shit, I posted an image of a graph from Site24x7, like I’ve done in this post. The response time in the earlier image is horrible, 4510 ms, but that’s a lot lower than I’m seeing now. As you can see from the image above in this post, the current average response time over the last 7 days is 6614 ms.

This has to be a result of something going on at Dreamhost. I say that because sometimes pages on longren.org will load up in a snap. Most of the time though they take between 15 and 30 seconds to load. Even sending queries to the database is slower than normal. Database queries are usually done being executed within 1 or 2 seconds. Lately, it’s been taking 5 to 9 seconds. Something is definitely up. Perhaps I will submit a support ticket to Dreamhost tomorrow. Yay.

MySQL Is Huge

Take note of this graphic. Notice there’s been 3,775,826 queries processed by that MySQL server in a little more than 5 days. Nothing too impressive right? Right.
Lots of Queries

We know MySQL can handle many more queries than that in a much shorter period of time. What amazes me is how well MySQL performs on the server it’s running on. The box hosting that MySQL server is an old HP. It’s got 1 Pentium II 400mhz processor with 128Mb of RAM. And it serves data to anywhere between 10 and 14 seperate PC’s at any given point in time. In addition to that, this MySQL server also provides data to a web interface that is used by 50 or so people. The MySQL server pumps out about 500Mb worth of data every day.

MySQL never ceases to amaze me in what it can do on less than optimal hardware.

Site Status From Site24x7

Notice the new Site Status link at the top of this page? That page shows the current response time of this site and site availability over the last 7 days. It’s really a very simple page. Nothing on it except for an iframe that grabs the site status from the Site24x7 servers.

Previously, Site24x7 only had the option to “Make Public” an entire group of sites being monitored by a given user. Now they’ve added the ability to “Make Public” individual sites within a users profile. So, instead of getting the status for a list of 5 or 6 sites, I can now display the status of this site and this site alone on this page.

I had requested a “Make Public” option on an individual site basis a couple weeks ago. I think they pretty much jumped right on it, I wasn’t expecting to see this feature ready to go so quickly. Nice work guys. 🙂 I’ve also submitted a couple other suggestions to them, which they seemed to like very much. Hopefully I’ll see those implemented too.

Since we’re on the topic of site monitoring, I came across another option besides Site24x7 today. It’s called Mon.itor.us. It looks really nice, but is sort of difficult to use. It’s interface isn’t very straight forward and feels really cluttered. They do have some nice features though such as reporting and a high level of customization.

I’ll be sticking with Site24x7. It’s cleaner, quicker, and they’ve used some of my suggestions. 🙂

UPDATE: I should have mentioned this before. Creating a “Site Status” page like mine is only possible if your theme will allow it. Some themes are simply too narrow for an effective status page to be created.