Copy.com Referrals Give Crazy Amounts of Free Cloud Storage Space

Lots of free cloud storage, 5GB for every referral 🙂

I use Copy a lot. I still maintain a Dropbox account for sharing files with friends who still use it, which is most of them honestly. But, I have such a crazy amount of free storage at Copy that I use it for absolutely everything.

All of my photos and video go there from my Nexus 4. On top of that, when my Nexus 4 gets full, I’ll just archive it to Copy, so I essentially have two of every photo and video in Copy. Dropbox holds just one copy of all videos and photos, I only have about 20GB of storage there, so that stuff eventually gets brought down to a local drive. Which I should probably just bring it local right off the bat and just skip Dropbox all together for that stuff. But I digress…

I’m currently using about 19GB out of 185GB available to me. It’s all due to this post I made back in August of 2013. It resulted in a bunch of referral signups, which gave me an additional 5GB each. I started out with 15GB of storage.

If you’re a blogger and want some decent amounts of free cloud storage, check out Copy. Drop your referral link in relevant posts and you’ll slowly start building up referrals and gaining additional storage.

Copy has clients for Android, iOS, Linux, Windows, MacOS, and probably others. Just visit their download page. I’ve been very impressed with Copy and have been using them for nearly a year. They’re run by Barracuda Networks.

I dig Copy’s Fair Storage concept, which they explain like this:

We believe in a simple concept of fairness. Everyone paying for the same data they are sharing doesn’t work for us. We think that’s like going to dinner together and everyone having to pay the entire bill. People sharing content should equally divide the amount of storage being used. With Copy, you can split the bill. So a 12 GB folder shared between 3 people only counts as 4 GB per person.

Unless I’m missing something, that sounds as lot better than what Dropbox does. With Dropbox, if someone shares a 4GB folder with me, that’s 4GB taken away from my available storage, plus the other persons. So both of us ending up getting the 4GB taken from our accounts. Fucked, but that’s a topic for another post.

I still think you should check out Copy. I seriously recommend it, and that’s after I’ve been using it constantly for nearly the last year. I’ve a couple minor gripes about the Linux client, but I can deal with them.

Affiliate links are rampant throughout this post. If you don’t want to help me out, here’s a non-affiliate link for Copy, and here’s a non-affiliate link for Dropbox. Pretty sure you get extra space if you sign up from an affiliate link though, so, your call. Here’s the affiliate Copy signup link and the affiliate Dropbox signup link. :)

How-To: Add Minimal-UI Viewport Meta Tag to WordPress

Introduced with iOS 7.1

I don’t have an iPhone, but my daughter does have an iPad Mini, which is running the latest iOS, 7.1. However, this only works for those of you on iPhone’s, so I see no difference. :

Martin Wolf was kind enough to let me use the image from his post about this subject so that I could more easily illustrate the difference. So, even if you don’t have an iPhone, you can still see the changes this makes in the featured image above.

With the release of iOS 7.1 (and possibly late 7.0.x builds), Safari introduced support for a new value in the viewport meta tag. To me, it sounds like it adds effects similar to how Chrome hides its top bar when a page is loaded, but more. For example, the navigation buttons at the bottom are hidden.

I rarely use Safari, like never. Chrome is available on iOS, so that’s what I’ve always used. That’s not to say that you shouldn’t support Safari to it’s fullest, because I’d wager that a majority of iOS users stick with the default, which is Safari.

Chances are, your theme already has a viewport meta tag defined in it’s header.php file. If it does, add minimal-ui to it, so it should look something like this:

<meta name="viewport" content="width=device-width, initial-scale=1, maximum-scale=1, minimal-ui" />

If your theme doesn’t already have a viewport meta tag set, you can add one with your functionality plugin or theme’s functions.php file like so:

<?php
function set_viewport() {
?>
<meta name="viewport" content="width=device-width, minimal-ui">
<?php
}
add_action('wp_head', 'set_viewport');
?>

Adding the code above will add a brand new viewport meta tag for you, so only use that if your theme isn’t already using a viewport meta tag in it’s header.php file.

That’s it!

Infographic: Global Cell Phone Statistics

The post title pretty much sums this one up. CouponAudit produced, with a little help from longren.org, an infographic showing Global Cell Phone Statistics. I’m not usually a fan of infographics but this one appealed to me due to it’s simplicity and the fact that I am pretty obsessed with smartphones, tablets, and other portable devices.

There’s not too many surprising things in it, but it’s interesting to note that older age groups (30+) have a higher percentage of e-readers compared with their younger (16 to 29) peers. I guess that makes sense, people like my mom and aunt are more likely to buy a Kindle or similar device than I am. I always go Android, unless I’m gifted an iOS device. Some e-readers just don’t have the flexibility that they should.

Somewhat surprisingly, only 25.6% of people in the 25 to 34 age group have smartphones. 25.6% is the highest percent from all the age groups, too. Every meatspace friend that I can think of owns a smartphone, so I’m not sure I totally agree with those numbers. Actually, there’s one friend who doesn’t own a smartphone, and he is probably the only IT Director in the country without a smartphone, but he refuses to get one. Most of my friends are in the 25 to 34 age range, with some quite older friends who even have smartphones. Perhaps it’s just due to the company I keep, who knows.

More interesting facts:

1. More than $150 billion was spent on mobile media globally in 2013.

2. The average american household spent, on average, $1,226 in 2013 for phone services. In 2007 it was $1,110 a year.

3. Samsung continues to be the most prolific manufacturers of smartphones and dumb phones.

4. 68% of smartphones run some version of Android, with 16.9% running Apple’s iOS.

5. Android recently hit 50 billion downloads on the Play Store.

6. The Apple AppStore hit 50 billion downloads 6 months earlier, but I think it had a considerable head-start with a well established app ecosystem from the git-go.

You can download the infographic right here. The link will open in a new tab. I’ve also included it after the break, if you’re reading from the frontpage, click the “Continue reading” link below to see the infographic embedded into this post. There’s also code you can copy to include the infographic on your website.

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