The FEDERATED MySQL Storage Engine

The FEDERATED MySQL storage engine is the coolest thing EVER! Seriously. It’s already saved me from having to do a whole bunch of synchronization coding. I can only imagine how it’ll come in useful in the future.

So, here’s my situation. I have two mysql servers sitting behind a firewall at “location 1”. People at “location 2” need to write some software to connect to both mysql servers at location 1. However, MyODBC gets confused when connecting to the same hostname on two different tcp ports, or so I’m told.

Anyway, since I was basically told that there’s no way to connect to two seperate mysql servers behind one firewall, I got to thinking. So, I set off searching google for method for mirroring data in MySQL and came across the FEDERATED storage engine.

Now, the servers at location 1 are on a VPN with the network at location 3, my location. So, my network (at location 3) can see the network at location 1 without the firewall getting in the way. Since that’s the case here, I can connect to the default mysql port, 3306, on both servers because I can see their LAN IP, where the people at location 2 can’t (no VPN).

So, we’ve got the network flow figured out, now we can go about getting the FEDERATED storage engine in MySQL working. First, you’ll need MySQL 5.x. I chose MySQL 5.0.24 as it’s the latest stable 5.x release.

To enable the FEDERATED storage engine in mysql 5, you must pass the –with-federated-storage-engine option when running configure. That’s pretty much all that’s required to start using the FEDERATED storage engine. Most linux distributions probably have a mysql 5 package that comes with the FEDERATED engine on already, although Slackware does not currently. Continue reading “The FEDERATED MySQL Storage Engine”

Improved Permalink Redirection

After a hard evenings work, I have a much better redirection method to replace the one I described in this post. Previously, I was simply guessing which post a searcher was looking for and displayed a link to that post.

That was all fine and dandy, but I have pretty good search ranking for various keywords. I’d like to keep it that way. After digging around a bit I came across the best method to keep my search rankings in place and manage to redirect the searcher to the desired post. Enter the 301 Permanent Redirect.

I found a nice simple PHP function to do redirection on any number of levels. This function has the ability to send specific HTTP/1.1 status codes based on the type of redirection desired. Since my old permalinks will never be valid again, I chose the 301 Permanent Redirect. A note, the function listed at the URL linked above doesn’t work as-is, you need to modify it. The modified function is below, plus some extra code. All of that code is in my themes header.php file.
Continue reading “Improved Permalink Redirection”

Looking Ahead: Slackware 11

Crossposted from Slackware Blog.

Well, we’re getting closer to a Slackware 11 release. What kind of software goodies can we expect from this release? On May 31st, KDE released KDE 3.5.3, which has since been included in slackware-current. Unless KDE makes another release soon, I expect we’ll see KDE 3.5.3 included in Slackware 11.

Slackware 11 is still using a 2.4 kernel by default, with the 2.6.16.20 kernel in “testing”. Chess Griffin is guessing Slackware 11 will be released on June 25th. I don’t think that’s gonna happen, but Chess made that guess back in May. I am guessing that Slackware 11 will be released around August 11th. I say that because we haven’t even seen Slackware 11 Beta 1 yet.

I would expect to see a 2.6 kernel as the default kernel in Slackware 11. Having a 2.4 kernel as the default is something people like to poke fun at Slackware for. Now that kernel 2.6 has been around for a few years, I expect Patrick will set it as the default. Patrick will make the right decision, as he always has, no matter which kernel he chooses to set as the default.

Other new software that will be included in Slackware 11 is MySQL 5.0, Apache 1.3.36, PHP 4.4.2, Mozilla Firefox 1.5.0.4, Mozilla Thunderbird 1.5.0.4, and X11 6.9.0. Now, this is software that’s currently included in slackware-current, so the version numbers may change slightly before Slackware 11 is actually released.

So far, it looks like we can expect a nicely polished release of Slackware 11, as usual. I’m just hoping Patrick decides to go with a 2.6 kernel by default.

On a somewhat releated note, this guy here at wordpress.com seems to be addicted to his Slackware box. Apparently it’s caused him to miss a few lunches, he’s having trouble dragging himself away from the beauty that is Slackware.

Somebody should drag me away from my PC. Ever since I installed Slackware on it, I could not get myself to stay away from the damn thing. My eyes are hurting, and my stomach is grumbling from missed lunches.

Hello DreamHost

You probably didn’t even notice, but this site is now being hosted at DreamHost. My main purpose for moving is stability. My server at home hasn’t been acting too well lately. When it gets too warm it’ll simply freeze up and will take 20 minutes to come back on. I’m pretty sure it’s a power supply issue. Simple to fix once I find the time to get another PSU.

Anyway, I transferred the domain registration and everything here to DreamHost. I got a wicked good deal. I paid one year in full already and got an 83% discount using the “DHM” dreamhost promo code. Original bill was $119.40, all I had to pay was $29.40.

I really enjoy DreamHost so far. I was able to replicate this whole site here on DreamHost except for the System Status page. It’s a great relief to have this site out of my house. I no longer wish to blatantly ignore the TOS provided by my ISP.

Please, if you notice any problems, get in touch with me.

WordPress 2.0.2

WordPress 2.0.2 is out, it’s a security release. Seems to fix some cross site scripting issues. This is from the WordPress development blog:

An important security issue has been brought to the attention of the WordPress team and we have worked diligently to bring you a new stable release that addresses it. Our latest version 2.0.2 contains several bugfixes and security fixes.

The problems addressed are unannounced XSS issues privately discovered and reported to the WordPress team. Thanks to Mark Jaquith, Robert Deaton, and David House for assisting with this release.

There ya have it, go upgrade your installations!